Sex Workers in Bangladesh hold national conference

Sex Workers in Bangladesh hold national conference

HARC, the HIV/AIDS Research and Welfare Centre organized a national sex workers conference in Dhaka Bangladesh on 17th and 18th July 2017. Over 100 sex workers attended this two-day conference with the theme “Nothing for us without us.” Red Umbrella Fund supported the event.

India: Over 2000 sex workers sign National Network of Sex Workers (NNSW) Statement, 25 Jan 2017

India: Over 2000 sex workers sign National Network of Sex Workers (NNSW) Statement, 25 Jan 2017

The National Network of Sex Workers has released a statement challenging the conference being organised by the "The Coalition for the Abolition of Prostitution International (Cap Intl)." The statement has been signed by over 2000 sex workers in India who reject the conflation of trafficking with sex work, and the conflation of sex work with violence.

Resourced and organised: achieving formal recognition of sex workers' skills in Australia

Resourced and organised: achieving formal recognition of sex workers' skills in Australia

The Scarlet Alliance National Training and Assessment Program (SANTAP) provides a unique example of how sex workers have pro-actively responded to stigma, discrimination, and ignorance about our profession.

"Making education safe for all" in Sonagachi, India

"Making education safe for all" in Sonagachi, India

Sex workers in Sonagachi, West Bengal, in India have taken a number of initiatives to improve education of sex workers and sex workers’ children. They include adult literacy and numeracy classes for sex workers, primary schools for young children of sex workers, a boarding hostel with private tuition for older children, and a co-operative banking system.

Midnight Blue protests mistreatment of arrested transgender sex workers

Midnight Blue protests mistreatment of arrested transgender sex workers

Midnight Blue followed the cases of more than 40 transgender sex workers who were arrested in Hong Kong over a period of four years. They found that the actions of law enforcement agencies seriously infringed the human rights of sex workers, and caused them significant psychological and emotional harm.

New South Wales Continues Support for Decriminalisation

The Australian State Government of New South Wales has continued its support for decriminalisation. Sex workers were concerned the inquiry into brothel regulation that begun in 2015 could have resulted in the introduction of a licensing framework and/or a specialised police squad for the sex industry. These measures would end decriminalisation, despite its documented success since it was introduced in 1995.Since the Inquiry was announced, sex workers and sex worker organisations have carried out a strong campaign to “Save Decriminalisation in NSW.” This included providing submission writing toolkits, writing submissions and providing evidence at parliamentary hearings on the importance of retaining decriminalisation.On the 9th of May, 2016 the NSW government published their response to the inquiry and reaffirmed their commitment and support for decriminalisation as a best practice and successful model of regulation of the sex industry. Scarlet Alliance, SWOP (Sex Worker Outreach Project NSW) and Touching Base issued a joint media statement welcoming the decision.Scarlet Alliance CEO Jules Kim explained, “licensing and the re-introduction of police as regulators would have been a significant step backwards.” Touching Base President, Saul Ibister spoke of the relief they felt seeing, “the NSW Government take a sensible, evidence- based response.”In their response, the government wrote:“The NSW Government will continue its current body of work to examine the issues relating to the regulation of brothels, to ensure that any system meets community expectations, combats criminal activity and protects vulnerable individuals from exploitation. The NSW Government has considered the regulatory recommendations of the final report of the Select Committee's inquiry as part of this work, as well as evidence-based best practice internationally and domestically. However, the NSW Government will not be introducing the licensing model described by the final report of the Select Committee because reintroducing such significant regulatory burdens and police involvement risks creating similar outcomes to recriminalising sex work.”In the lead up to the inquiry, there was a panic in the media about ‘illegal brothels’, or brothels that were operating without local council authorisation.Many submissions addressed the issue of discrimination by local councils against sex industry businesses, including private workers. In their submission, Touching Base discussed their 2015 research with the University of Technology, Sydney which had found widespread discrimination against sex industry businesses (including private individual sex workers) who had attempted to apply for local council authorisation. Janelle Fawkes from Scarlet Alliance told media in 2015 that there would be widespread outcry if decriminalisation of sex work was lost, “Particularly, if it is replaced on a whim to appease councils who refuse to work within the intent of the laws… and to do their part of what is a very effective whole-of-government model of regulation.”These issues around local council planning approvals were considered by the inquiry. Alex Greenwich MP, Labor MP’s Jo Haylen and Kathy Smith stated in their media release they had argued against licensing, noting a better approach was to “properly resource councils to deal with unauthorised brothels, including designating staff within the Department of Local Government to coordinate with local government, community organisations and police.” Alex Greenwich added, “It’s important that local councils are given the support and resources they need to manage planning issues around sex services premises and it was clear from the inquiry that the City of Sydney’s practical rather than moral approach is the most effective.”Minister for Better Regulation, Victor Dominello was quoted in media stating. “the evidence from other jurisdictions is that licensing simply doesn’t work.”This was made clear to the NSW Government in many of the submissions made to the Inquiry. For example Vixen Collective, the sex worker collective based in the Australian state of Victoria, testified in their submission that “under licensing systems access to police for sex workers is significantly reduced due to the oppositional roles sex workers and police are placed in.”Greens NSW MP and Status for Women spokesperson, Dr Mehreen Faruqi commented in a media release “whilest the NSW Government should never have even established such an inquiry dominated by conservative politicians, it is good to see they have refused to endorse the more extreme recommendations.”  Greens NSW MP and Justice Spokesperson, David Shoebridge explained “If criminal laws are broken then police should be involved, if planning regulations are broken then local councils need powers, this is the same for the sex work industry as every other industry in the state.““Recognising sex work as a real work means recognising that sex-industry specific legislation is unnecessary and inappropriate,” David Shoebridge concluded.

HARC Hosts Regional Training on Community Empowerment

... thirty nine sex workers took part in the workshop in Rajshahi ... [which] focussed on three themes: human rights, community empowerment and leadership.

"Reclaiming Rights: Sex Workers Speak" ICAAP Session

A session called “Reclaiming Rights: Sex Workers Speak” was held on the first day of the 12th International Conference on AIDS in the Asia Pacific (ICAAP)  in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The conference ran from the 12 -14 of March.The session was organised by SANGRAM (India) and hosted by the National Network of Sex Workers India (NNSW) and the Asia Pacific Network of Sex Workers (APNSW). At this session, sex workers from India, Nepal, Australia, Myanmar and Cambodia talked about how the decriminalisation of sex work and the involvement of sex workers in anti-trafficking initiatives are vital to ensuring their rights.Mukta from NNSW explained that their organisation is working for the rights of sex workers, full decriminalisation and against violence.Jules, from Scarlet Alliance explained that decriminalisation was introduced to the Australian state of New South Wales as part of addressing widespread police corruption. She talked about the positive outcomes it has brought for sex workers. She also highlighted the findings from the Lancet edition on Sex Work which found that decriminalisation of sex work reduces HIV and also increases access to care.Sangita from VAMP, SANGRAM based in Sangli, Maharashtra, India introduced SANGRAM and explained that they work in 5 districts with around 5000 female, male and transgender sex workers and their children in India. She said, “we believe that anyone in sex work or other trade has a right to choose. If women or others in sex work are decriminalised, we are best placed to fight trafficking."The effects of the criminalisation of sex work were then discussed in a Cambodian context by Dany. Dany explained that one of the issues they face is that “sex work is not considered work in Cambodia.” Dany then talked about the fact that in some cases the government is trying to reduce HIV by giving condoms to sex workers. At the same time, the police use condoms as evidence of sex work. This then creates a conflict between sex workers and those who implement laws or policies. Dany added that sex workers are considered “worse than criminals and imprisoned without rights.”“When sex workers question police about arrest, they say the government orders them. When sex workers ask government officers about this, they feign ignorance. So no one is responsible for sex workers rights,” Dany said, “it is great that WNU (Women’s Network for Unity) is representing sex workers, especially during arrest.”Bijaya of JMMS (Federation of Female Sex Workers in Nepal) spoke about the situation faced by sex workers in Nepal. She told the session that violence perpetrated by police is high. “Due to unclear law and arrest under specific laws, we have no human rights, healthcare access or other services. Daily, we face violence from clients, lovers, health workers, friend, police, hotel or brothel owners.”Yu yu from AMA, a sex worker-led organisation in Myanmar discussed a study called the Right(s) Evidence Sex Work, Violence and HIV in ASIA: A Multi-Country Qualitative Study. Yu Yu explained, “there is a need for a study on the violence experienced by sex workers. Advocacy is being done for government officers who do not know sex workers’ realities and harass them. The government performs studies on sex workers by supposed experts who do not know about sex workers fully, do not do proper research, do not approach us or take our views. In our study, 1300 male, women transgender and sex workers living with HIV participated.”More discussion time allowed those present to ask questions and find out more about the work being done in different countries.  Many of the issues discussed were found to be common experiences. It was concluded that the work being done must continue as the issues facing sex worker community still remain.

Another Red-Light Area Closes in Indonesia

"Loss of livelihood is the first impact on sex workers. They lose their jobs and a place to earn money. ... [But] closures lead to a change of location, not of profession ... forcibly displaced sex workers work on the streets or in another venue ... the government is never going to make sex work disappear or go away."

Cambodian Sex Workers Arrested and Detained during “Street Sweeps”

"Fourteen sex workers were arrested on the 24th of January in Cambodia, and taken to the infamous ‘rehabilitation’ centre known locally as Prey Speu.This makes a total of 289 sex workers arrested in the last 13 months ... "